Joseph Farris, noted New Yorker cartoonist, dies at 90

Joseph Farris, noted New Yorker cartoonist, dies at 90

Joe Farris, whose cartoons were published in The New Yorker for 57 years, passed away yesterday at his home in Connecticut. He was most known for his 70's-inspired drawing style, and he was a part of a circle of noted Connecticut cartoonists and artists who also contributed to The New Yorker.


In addition to being an accomplished New Yorker cartoonist for over 57 years, Joe's cartoons appeared in numerous publications internationally.  His many books include Phobias and Therapies, A Cog in the Wheel, and They're a Very Successful Family.  The 2012 National Geographic publication of his book A Soldier's Sketchbook was one of his proudest accomplishments.  A memoir of his time in WWII,  the book includes his letters home to his family and artwork he produced while there. A Joe and Emily Lowe Award-winning painter, his works are in the private collections of President Jimmy Carter, Paul Newman, Colleen Dewhurst, William Safire and Paul Mellon, as well as the Library of Congress.  Joe's cartoons, paintings and sculptures have been the subject of one-man and group shows at the Ward Eggleston Gallery, the Karpeles Museum and the Bruce Museum. Many of his cartoons are also in the permanent collection of the Morgan Library & Museum in New York. 
 
Joe will be remembered by his family for his gentleness, his distinct sense of humor and deep belief in and practice of tolerance.  He gave generously to others in many ways including serving food for many years at the Dorothy Day Hospitality House in Danbury. 

He was the ex-father-in-law to SPD Board member Francesca Messina, who posted this tribute.

(image sources: estate of Joseph Farris, Allposters.com, The New Yorker Cartoon Bank)
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