Five Questions for Tracey Woods, Associate Photo Editor

Five Questions for Tracey Woods, Associate Photo Editor


Edited by Joseph Caserto

Ever looked at a magazine's masthead and wondered just what do all those job titles actually mean? What does a photo producer actually do? Does a deputy art director get a shiny badge? And why are some people creative directors and others design directors? 
  
Our blog series "Five Questions for..."  is here to help answer those questions and give you insight into working in the world of publication design. Is there a particular job that you want to know more about? Email  us at spdstudentoutreach@gmail.com and we'll find an expert who does it. They'll give you their take, and then it's up to you to put their advice to work. Read on to find out what being an Associate Photo Editor is like for Tracey Woods.

Editor's Note:  Essence  Magazine is a past host of our Pub(lications) Crawl.

The Pro's Work

SPDU_5Q4_TraceyWoods_3.jpg



SPDU_5Q4_TraceyWoods_1.jpg




SPDU_5Q4_TraceyWoods_2.jpg



About the Pro
 
SPDU_5Q4_TraceyWoods_4.JPG
Tracey Woods
Associate Photo Editor
  
Works for: Essence Magazine 
Went to: Pratt Institute
Degree Earned: MFA, Photography
Twitter: @traceysees 
Instagram: @traceysees


1. Imagine you're talking to someone who has never heard of your job. How would you describe it to them?
I work closely with editors and art directors to conceive the photo visuals for the magazine and how the images will complement the text of each story. This includes hiring the right photographers for the job, and doing photo research to find existing images from stock agencies like Corbis Images and Getty Images. My job also entails photo shoot production: casting models; hiring hair, makeup, prop, and wardrobe stylists; scouting locations, and whatever else is needed to make the shoot successful.

2. What about your job makes you love it?
I love all aspects of photography, especially collaborating with talented people to create beautiful images.

3. What do you think of as the big break in your career?
There were several mini breaks that happened because I've worked in all aspects of the photography business. I started out as a photo assistant and worked my way up to being a studio manager, and producer of advertising and editorial shoots for photographers and photo reps. This led to freelance work for several magazines and book publishers, where I did photo research and shoot production. Each of these experiences has built my skills and prepared me for my current position.
4. What is your biggest professional mistake or regret?
I don't have any regrets. Each experience is a learning one.

5. What advice or parting words do you have for anyone who wants to do what you do?
My advice is to have an appreciation or love of photography. Also, network. Meeting and staying in touch with your colleagues and mentors is key for any career choice.


Is there a particular job that you want to know more about? Email us at spdstudentoutreach@gmail.com and we'll find an expert who does it. They'll give you their take, and then it's up to you to put their advice to work. 



blog comments powered by Disqus